Vatican Sculpture

Vatican Sculpture I
Vatican Sculpture I

 

Here’s a couple of shots of some sculptures in the museums and grounds of the Vatican.  This one to start was pilfered from Egypt.  Theft is kind of a theme with Vatican art – that or spending church money on it.  See also the obelisk in St. Peter’s Square – not native to Italy, that’s for sure!

 

But still, the kitty is cute.

 

Vatican Sculpture II
Vatican Sculpture II

 

Now on to Grecian and Greek-inspired art.

Vatican Sculpture III

And here’s Hermes, a.k.a. Mercury for the Romans.

 

Vatican Sculpture IV

 

This one’s an odd piece of a piece, but I liked it.  Next, some items from the pre-Roman, Etruscan era.

 

Vatican Sculpture V
Vatican Sculpture V

 

This is a casket, but I particularly like the dog at the base of it.  For being so-called primitive artists, it’s amazing how lifelike this is!

 

Vatican Sculpture VI
Vatican Sculpture VI

 

And this is the side of a piece of pottery.  Not too fancy, but I liked the lion.

Next time, paintings from the Vatican, a.k.a. the more famous stuff.  Plus an explainer on why photos are a mega-size no-no in the Sistine Chapel.

Happy shooting!

 

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Forum

Roman Forum I
Roman Forum I

 

Welcome to the heart of Ancient Rome, the Forum.  Couple thousand years back, you’d have seen a bunch of dudes in togas milling about, buying and selling, arguing about politics and religion, and so on.

 

Yeah, so not much changes, except thankfully for better hygiene.  Not sure whether I’m glad or not that Emperor Vespasian introducing pay-only public toilets (still referred to locally as Vespasiana).

 

Roman Forum II
Roman Forum II

 

Here’s a view in infrared from the entrance from nearer the south end, looking northward.  The remains of the Temple of Vesta are on the left, and the Temple of Caesar on the right.

 

Roman Forum III
Roman Forum III

 

And here’s another of the Temple of Caesar, from the front.

 

Roman Forum IV
Roman Forum IV

 

This is actually outside the forum.  Looking toward the middle, you’ll see a smaller arch (the Arch of Titus, wherein is depicted the sack of Jerusalem in the 1st century).  That’s the southern end of the forum.  The larger arch in the foreground is the more famous Arch of Constantine, and the photos taken from the 3rd level of the colosseum.

 

Roman Forum V
Roman Forum V

 

And some ground level color, from within the forum proper.

 

Roman Forum VI
Roman Forum VI

 

And finally, this is from the top of Palatine Hill (behind the Temple of Vesta), where the likes of Augustus lived.  Not a bad view from pup here, huh?

 

Side note, I was expecting much gnarlier hills in Rome.  Guess that’s what seeing San Francisco as a child gets me.  Palatine’s nothing next to Taylor Street!

 

Happy shooting!

 

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Piazza Navona Fountains

Fountain of Neptune

Fountain of Neptune 

This is a series of photos of the fountains in Piazza Navona in Rome.  This is the fountain of Neptune, with him spearing an octopus with his trident.  Here’s another view of the same:

 

Fountain of Neptune
Fountain of Neptune

 

There were 2 tricks used here.  One, we got here super early, before the crowds went nanners.  Which meant we left the hotel SUPER early, since we were south of the Colosseum, and it meant around a 2+ mile walk, with constant stops to photograph other stuff.  Two, lots of walking around the fountains to find desirable angles.

 

Fountain of the Four Rivers
Fountain of the Four Rivers

 

This is the central fountain, the Fountain of the Four Rivers by Bernini.  Here’s a closeup angle on one of the sides.

 

Fountain of the Four Rivers
Fountain of the Four Rivers

 

And a large-scale shot, with half the piazza in view in the background.

 

Fountain of the Four Rivers
Fountain of the Four Rivers

 

And finally, the fountain at the southern end of the piazza, the Fountain of the Moor.

 

Fountain of the Moor
Fountain of the Moor

 

This really is a lovely location, provided you’re there when it’s not crammed like a NYC subway station.  Going on weekdays will help, if you can manage it, as will waking up early.  But above all go, as it’s not something to miss!

 

Happy shooting!

 

See more of my work at

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Something Old, Ahead of Something New

Happy Couple
Happy Couple

 

The “something old” I’m referring to is stereotypes.  Because really, Italy + romance = cliche, no?  When I was wandering the basilica gardens at the top of Aventine Hill, this couple really stood out in the early morning gloom with St. Peter’s in the background.

 

I thought about it before bothering with the shot, since it does have a “been there done that” quality to it.  But then again, so do postcard shots, and that’s no reason to stop doing those, so I figured, what the hell, go for it – and play around and see what I can get.

 

Happily, the couple in question was utterly oblivious.  As well they should have been.

 

So here’s an alternate version …

 

Happy Couple, Vertical Shot
Happy Couple, Vertical Shot

 

And a wider shot, but in infrared …

 

Happy Couple, Infrared
Happy Couple, Infrared

 

The top shot is definitely the more stereotypical, but I really like the 3rd one as well.

 

Now onto something new … starting next week, I’m going to commence a new project: photographing day to day activities and trying to make them look interesting.  I expect I’ll be doing more post-production and more shots on my phone, but I’m curious to see what I can come up with.  That, and no travel plans for a few months, boo! But the next trip DID just get paid for, so time to plan, plan, plan for that one …

 

Happy shooting!

 

See more of my work at

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Shooting Around Crowds, II

St Peters, Altar
St Peters, Altar

As promised, the next edition of crowds – St. Peter’s and Sistine Chapel version.

If anything these are even more crowded than the rest of the Vatican, and for good reason.  Everyone and their brother has heard of Michelangelo’s ceiling of the Sistine Chapel and wants to see it for themselves.  But to be honest, after all the buildup, it’s a bit of a disappointment because (1) yeah, it’s freakin’ crowded, (2) it’s at the end of a long tour and I was bushed already, and (3) no photos allowed, and they mean it.  Mainly because the Fuji film company paid for a bunch of the restoration and owns the photographic rights for a long time.  Very nice place, though, I’d love to go back when my mind is fresh and I have binoculars to better pick out the detail (it’s a high ceiling).

 

St Peters, Main Area
St Peters, Main Area

 

So on to St. Peter’s!  It doesn’t’ seem as crowded, mainly because it’s gigantic in every dimension.  You could easily fit the population of a small town in there and not feel crowded.

Word of warning though – it is free to go to (it’s a church after all), so it’s a big draw for pickpockets looking for sucker tourists.  Mind yourself and your gear in that crowd!

To get good shots you’ll have to be patient, and work your way to the front of the line to see the impressive stuff.  Or have long arms and steady hands.  Or if you have REALLY well trained children who know how to follow directions, put ’em on your shoulders and have them shoot it.

 

Pieta
Pieta

 

Here’s the original of Micelangelo’s Pieta, that I showed a reproduction of last post, now behind glass ‘cuz some nutso took a hammer to Jesus’ hand a few years back and knocked off some fingers.  Stupid asshat.  Pretty sure that’s a few extra years in Purgatory right there.

This place will take a lot of time to work your way through, especially if you want a good photo or two that doesn’t come from the gift shop or a tourist stand in the city.  It’s worth the wait, though, and this is one of the few places you CAN stop and think and reshoot as needed, without issue.

 

St Peters, exterior, IR
St Peters, exterior, IR

 

Happy shooting!

PS for your extra little bit of Italy … when eating lunch afterward, we asked for water and were kindly reminded by our waitress – “water is for shower, drink wine!”

See more of my work at

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Shooting Around Crowds

Michelangelo's Pieta
Michelangelo’s Pieta

Shooting in a crowded area, when the crowd itself isn’t the object of your work, just plain SUCKS.  It’s a huge pain.  Case in point here: the Vatican Museums.

This is a slightly popular spot.  In the sense that a sea of humanity moving along like the tide of the ocean is a “small crowd.”  What it means in practice is, not much time to compose and shoot, and minimal (if any) chances on a re-do.  Doubly a nuisance given the world-class art and architecture that I was trying to capture.

da Vinci
da Vinci

Like I said, world class.  And unfortunately, very dark in most galleries, and flash is a huge no-no (like instant ticket to the place of fire – as it should be).  So I shot on ISO 1600, as high as I could stomach, and have to do a lot of painstaking sharpening and noise reduction afterward at home.  And that’s even with a private guide and getting in early!  I’d hate to think of just blundering about in there.

Caravaggio
Caravaggio

Clear proof that photographers are johnny-come-latelys when it comes to painting with light.  To think that people of his day thought he stunk!  Imbeciles, all.

Bramante Staircase
Bramante Staircase

But not all areas are crowded, if you plan ahead and are willing to shell out some money.  This is the Bramante staircase, made in the 1500s for Pope Innocent VIII, to allow him to ride his carriage all the way up to his palace without having to walk.  Lazy sod.

Historical note – the same Bramante that built this suggested that the Holy See hire Michelangelo to paint the Sistine Chapel, thinking that this sculptor from Florence was a hack who’d bungle it and make Bramante look good.  Oops.

More on crowds next time, St. Peter’s and Sistine Chapel edition!

See more of my work at

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Pantheon

Pantheon Ceiling and Oculusc
Pantheon Ceiling and Oculus

Welcome to the Pantheon, the marvel of ancient Roman engineering.  Prior to the Renaissance, what you’re looking at is the largest dome in the world.

And frankly, even more than the rest of Rome, THIS put me in awe.  It doesn’t look like much from the outside (concrete stained with soot from pollution), but the second you pass the doors, it’ll take your breath away.

Think – without calculus, or calculators, or modern machinery, they figured out to coffer the ceiling to reduce weight and install an open center.  Mind the rain, though.

Pantheon Interior
Pantheon Interior

At one point it was converted to a church, and now is (more or less) a museum to Roman, Christian, and Italian heritage.  Also, free admission!  So it’s popular, and best to watch your wallet and camera gear.

Fit for a King
Fit for a King

This is the tomb of the first king of unified Italy, Vittorio Emmanuel II (bear in mind Italy was unified in the late 1800s, so this part isn’t all that ancient).

Cowabunga!
Cowabunga!

And here’s the tomb of everyone’s favorite Ninja Turtle, Raphael!

Oops, I mean “fantastic Renaissance painter” Raphael.  My bad.  Also a super-disappointing photograph for me.  There was an obnoxious crowd and bad reflections and funky contrast, and PS didn’t do jack for me.  Sigh.  Must mean I have to go back to Rome (again, sigh).

PS – don’t think to lie on the ground in the center of the building to get a wider angle on the ceiling, unless you want to get scolded by security like I did.  Really, we photographers are far worse than children.

See more of my work at

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